Posts Tagged ‘consistency’

Broscience. Many of us have heard the term, seen the people that spread it, and have probably enjoyed a few baffled moments at the expense of the dispenser of such information.

For those lucky enough to have avoided this experience, a Bro is anyone that starts feeding you stringent rules about what you should and should not do to gain muscle or get healthy. I’m not talking the mental stuff I get into, these guys will tell you (and sell you if they can) any meal plan, workout plan, or supplementation plan they can.

Urban Dictionary’s take on the matter? “Broscience is the predominant brand of reasoning in bodybuilding circles where the anecdotal reports of jacked dudes are considered more credible than scientific research.”

 

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Translation: It’s all bullshit.

I have stayed away, for the most part, from the specifics on what I do. Not because I have any issue telling anyone how I work out or how I eat. If you really want to know, I’ll tell you. The caveat to that is one simple disclaimer:

“This is what works for me.”

I have absolutely zero problem talking to anyone about getting in shape, about how I got in shape, or ways they can maybe get started. Anyone who markets themselves to you as a personal trainer, though, should be questioned. Ask for their badge (i.e. certifications.) It’s as easy to become a “Personal Trainer” as it is to become an ordained minister through the power of the Almighty Interwebs.

I had a conversation with a friend of mine the other day who is vastly more qualified than I to give anyone any type of workout advice. She’s a Certified Athletic Trainer, and I don’t mean the online variety. I’m talking Bachelors Degree (see also: way smarter than me.)

Needless to say, I pester her with questions all the time.

The question I asked her the other day wasn’t nearly so textbook for her to answer. “What do I tell people who ask me for help getting in shape?”

I asked because I never want to fall into that category. I feel like I flirt with that line every so often on here and I cringe at the very thought of it.

It’s also not that I don’t want to help. I got started by asking somebody the same thing and they totally hooked me up. My problem is that I’m not altogether comfortable with the idea of giving people specific. The truth is that I barely have specific advice for myself.

I have no way to convey the hours of personal research and trial and error I went through, and still go through, to get results. I tried to explain this to a friend of mine and the following analogy was the best way I could put it into words.

I’m decently handy with a guitar. I’m not great, but I don’t completely suck either. It was a passion of mine growing up and I poured lots of time into it. Inevitably, when I play in front of people, someone asks, “How’d you get so good?”

The answer is always, “Lots of lonely hours in my bedroom.”

That’s the truth. I have played my guitar to the walls of my room for more hours than I have ever played for another person. The same can be said for how I have gotten in shape.

Not a day goes by that I don’t read an article about different types of workouts or nutrition. Internet, books, friends who are actually qualified trainers (shameless shoutout). I absorb everything I can and I go try it. I have made mistakes, I have eaten some weird shit, I have pushed too hard, I’ve hurt myself (minor), I have sucked so many more times than I’ve written about on here.

All anyone sees is my before and after picture, and I’m fine with that. I want people to be motivated to get in shape and be healthy. My mind is continuously blown that some people have done just that because of me and that picture.

Someone recently asked the same friend I told the guitar analogy to about my specifics. His answer was simple and kind of took me by surprise.

“I told him, he just does everything. He changed everything about his life to reach his goal.” Not exactly how I would put it, but I appreciate his words. I also can’t argue with them.

I said it when I started this blog, there is no magic pill to losing weight and being healthy. There is no silver bullet that will, at the simple pull of a trigger, give you life altering results.

I could give someone the exact workouts I do, the exact food that I eat, and the timing for all of the above. They could do it, it might even work.

But it might not.

What will work, every single time, is hard work and consistency. If someone makes an effort to learn about eating healthy and working out effectively and then applies that knowledge in a consistent manner to their lives they will achieve what they set out to do.

Having said all of that, the safe starting points I got from the conversation with my qualified friend are pretty simple.

-Eat whole foods. If it comes in a bag or a can, it’s not the way to go. The best tip I’ve heard is to shop at the edges of the store where they keep the fresh stuff. Vegetables, meat, fruit. All of that stuff. Diet is huge when it comes to getting healthier.

-Prepare. Call it meal prep or whatever buzzword you want. If it weren’t for the fact that I planned on being hungry and made healthy choices available to myself, the fast food options would have been more of an issue. As it is, I prepare meals for my entire week. It’s a little time consuming on the day that I do it, sure, but it also has saved me money by not having to hit the cafeteria or a fast food place when I need some food.

-Get active. You don’t have to go to a gym. If you like walking, start walking more. You want to get into hiking, do it. Get a bike. Join a recreational sport league. Start running. Play a pickup game with some friends on the weekend. Chase after your kids rather than just following along. Make your kids chase after you. Just today I went to a hotel that has one helluva staircase going 15 floors in one direction without having to spiral upwards. I climbed it 10 times and I’m not going to the gym today.

Finally, a quote that really gets me thinking about everything I’ve learned throughout this whole journey:

“In an age of information, ignorance is a choice.”

Don’t overcomplicate things. Get smart, act smart, make progress. Simple.

-Moody

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