Archive for the ‘motivation’ Category

I could write an entire post about running the Tough Mudder this weekend, but it wouldn’t mean much to anyone not running one. Instead, I’ll focus on what I felt upon completing the course and why it wasn’t what I thought I would feel.

That being said, a quick blurb never hurts. The race was challenging, as it’s meant to be. Men and women of a wide range of fitness levels were out on the course giving it they’re all. It was pretty inspiring and one of my teammates, who was self admittedly well out of shape prior to this, said, “It’s easy when you’re running on your own or doing burpees to stop. But when you’ve got all these people pushing, man, it motivates you to just keep going.”

I don’t have a whole lot to add to that; he nailed it.

Pushing on to completion though, I felt proud of all of everyone who made it through, especially the ones who were hesitant to sign up until I pestered them (I’d apologize, but you know who you are and you’re happy you did it).  As it relates to myself, though , I wasn’t really proud of those few hours I spent on the course.

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I was proud of everything I did to prepare for it. I spent hours sweating on gym floors, sidewalks, and fields so that I could control how my body works. I put so much effort into figuring out what fuel my body runs best on that I could write a ten page paper comparing how I react to certain foods. I’ve got notebooks full of chicken scratch about workouts, what worked versus what didn’t, my strengths, and my weaknesses. Completing the course and still feeling good, while also exhausted, was just proof that I had put in the effort. That effort was the most important thing to me.

That’s an interesting realization, right? Don’t get me wrong, I had a blast on the course and will definitely be doing it again. I’m also more sore today than I have ever been in my whole life; I can’t walk right. Where I really found out how strong I was, both physically and mentally, was the work behind the scenes. Kind of like any athlete I’ve ever admired; their success begins off-screen, not in the championship game.

The hardest thing to do, for me, was to adjust my mindset to that framework. Recently, I had a conversation with an old friend, that I haven’t talked to in years, and I described how I approach life these days. Because that’s what you do when you catch up with people, right? Get all deep and introspective? No? Maybe just certain people then.

“I figured out that I’m better when I’m challenging myself and struggling to achieve. So I put myself in those situations,now, where I’m supposed to lose just to prove that I can win.”

That really does sum up how I do things. I used to shy away from challenges and take the easy way out. All that got me was sleep apnea, self loathing, and perceived life sentence of mediocrity.

Not a good combination.

So here’s my challenge, and it doesn’t have to be fitness/health related. I challenge everyone I know (especially the spammers who follow this blog) to put themselves in a situation where 51% of the vote goes to the other team. Where you’re going to have to fight tooth and nail to come out on top. Take your comfort zone, everything you think you know about yourself, all of your insecurities; throw them away.

Even if you’ve got to sign up for it 6 months in advance like I did for the Tough Mudder, commit yourself to something you don’t think you’re ready for. I’d bet good money that you’ll come out mentally stronger than you went in.

What have you really got to lose?

-Moody

 

The secret.

That’s what everyone wants, right? That’s the headline that commercials use to sell you something that will, supposedly, grant you your greatest wish.

You want to be skinny, take this pill. You want abs, buy this device. You want muscles, do this program for just 15 minutes a day.

I believe that they’re selling something else that’s much worse. I believe that all of these products are designed to make you feel like less. People want to sell you a feeling of inadequacy so that you’ll give them your money to feel better.

Frankly, that shit pisses me off.

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This man spits truth

Everyone is capable of living a healthy life without buying into a bunch of bullshit. I looked in a mirror one day and decided I didn’t like what I saw so I decided to do something about it. You know what special stuff I bought?

Spinach. Chicken. Turkey. Almonds. An abbreviated list for sure, but you get my point.

Everything else was sweat and, spoiler alert, you don’t have to pay anyone to work up a sweat.

That being said, I did realize something at the gym this morning.

Okay, yeah, I pay for the gym. I’m a hypocrite. But I didn’t pay for a gym until over a year into my “get healthy” kick.  I digress…

I wasn’t completely feeling it when I got to the gym. It was one of those days where I walked in and just wasn’t focused. I did a decent warm up and decided to go down to the punching bags to see if I could get into a groove. They help me focus and cut out distractions.

I still got distracted, but in the best possible way.

There are pull-up bars at the bunching bags and I figured I might as well knock a few out. As I got to the top of the first one, I felt good.

Second one, still good.

Third one, I pause at the top and look down at the bar.

Fourth one, I pause again to look at the bar.

It wasn’t that long ago that I couldn’t do pull-ups. I was that kid in P.E. that dreaded the physical fitness tests because the pull-ups were the one damn thing I couldn’t do. Granted, I wasn’t the only one, but it was still embarrassing to me.

I dropped down from the bar and I looked up at it and started laughing. The poor guy doing air squats a few feet away looked slightly alarmed, so I checked myself and got back to pulling. From that moment on, I was on fire. I was all over the place in the gym and my shirt was drenched by the end of it. I ignored everyone else and did my own thing. I was focused.

Cue “Eye of the Tiger” or “Danger Zone”. Whatever you prefer for the mental montage I just painted in your brain.

I had fallen back in love with the process all over again.

That’s the secret. Not just to getting in shape, but to pretty much everything.

I’ve talked here and there about my music playing. I was never a natural and had friends that were. I played soccer and learned how to be a pretty decent goalie, but I was never a natural like my friends who seemingly channeled Pele at times. I was incredibly jealous of people who just “got it.” People who could just pick something up and do it. I was never that guy.

The fact that I was never a natural at anything is my greatest gift. Anything I’ve ever wanted to be good at or improve at I have had to work for. I’ve had to pour everything I’ve got into making even a measly inch of progress. My buddy has watched me land flat on my back learning how to properly kick the punching bag. He pointed out, though, that I popped back up and tried it again.

(Full disclosure: both my pride and ass were sore that day. Such is life.)

For all of those things, the common denominator is falling in love with making progress; however small it may be. That’s the real secret. Sure, I’ve spouted off about hard work and consistency hundreds of times, but those things pale in comparison to simply enjoying what it is you’re doing.

Don’t pay somebody so that you can feel like less. You’ve got this.

-Moody

Recently, I’ve had an interesting go of it with a whole bunch of friends jumping on the health wagon. I think this is pretty much the coolest thing in the world. What I dig even more is the fact that they’re all telling me about it, they are all excited about it, and they are all willing to put in some serious effort to take care of business.

Lemme tell ya, as someone who remembers the beginning, you must have this kind of positive attitude. If you walk into it all sorts of negative, you aren’t going to get very far before you start to question your resolve. That’ll happen to people with the best of attitudes anyway, so it’s best to start out on the up side of things.

A common occurrence when they approach me has been the question everyone has asked at least once in their lives; or in my case, thousands of times.

“Where do I start?”

On the surface that seems like a pretty easy question, right?

Nope. My blank return stare the first time it was posed to me is proof of that.

At first I would just regurgitate what I had done. If you’ve read some of my past posts, you know that I don’t necessarily think that’s the best approach for everyone nor do I consider myself qualified to recommend it to everyone.

Following that, after I had established this blog, I would simply point people here. I still do this, especially when they ask me what I did specifically to get in shape. I know that reading about other people’s stories in regards to their health has helped me, so I figure it probably works for others.

I almost always go on and on about my friend who got me started on this path. The guy who lost a bunch of weight, told me what he did, is still my workout partner, and is one of the few people I consider a close friend. Without fail, anytime I bring it up around him he always deflects.

“I just gave him the tools, he did the rest.”
“Dammit man! Just take my credit!”

Very frustrating.

Just recently, though, that’s changed. I get what he means. I had to be the one to decide to do it. I had to be the one to decide to make a change in my life. Me. Not him. Not my other friends. Me.

I made that choice before I even knew where to start. The notion of a specific starting point is useless until you are actually willing to start. I decided to make a change for the better and then I asked him for help. In that specific order.

Fast forward to the present, I stumbled across a quote recently that has absolutely nothing to do with health and fitness from a person who, to my knowledge, has absolutely nothing to do with health and fitness.

Which makes perfect sense.

From the almighty Joss Whedon, “Write it. Shoot it. Publish it. Crochet it, sauté it, whatever. MAKE.”

Make might not be the right word, so let’s change it to,DO.”

Fine, Nike kind of said this as well… but, YOU GUYS, Joss Whedon is way cooler; so we will ignore the big evil corporation.

In the beginning, I’m not convinced that the biggest issue is what you are going to do. I believe the issue needs to be that you are simply going to do. You’ve got to— we’ve all got to— commit to the idea of doing. It’s that simple. Unfortunately, it’s always the simple stuff that’s hard.

I wake up every damn day with the idea firmly planted in my head that I am going to do something that contributes to my goals. Whether it’s eat the right things, do a specific workout, or take a rest day; I am going to DO.

To anyone starting, or even in the middle of this:

Do something. Do anything. Run. Walk. Lift. Eat better. Ask for help. It doesn’t matter, just DO.

-Moody

You know that moment when you’re lying in bed, trying to fall asleep, and failing miserably?

That moment when you think of all of the things you’re gonna do tomorrow. All of the things that you could have been doing all along but this time, yeah this time, you’re gonna do them.

Right?

Then sleep comes, the alarm goes off all too soon, and you get up to go about your day.

A few things can happen next.

You could go about business as usual. Eat breakfast, grab a coffee, go to work.

Rinse. Repeat.

You could ponder, for a moment, about those thoughts you had the night before. You could make an excuse about being too busy, about doing it tomorrow. You know, tomorrow, when you’ve got more time. Yeah, that sounds good.

Rinse. Repeat.

Or today, this very second, you could choose to act on those thoughts. Take action. Make a change. Whatever it is you need to do to accomplish those thoughts that are always creeping around in the back of your mind but you never do anything about.

Do that. Do those things. Do anything. But, dammit, do something.

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I broach this subject now because we’re a month away from New Years. Some of those fresh faces I saw in the gym that were so motivated are gone. I had an issue with “Resolutioners” but it’s not what you think.  I hate seeing them quit.

I’ve been there. Granted, I started in the month of June; it was a resolution all the same. I remember how hard it was to keep going. I remember how hard it was to not throw in the towel and accept the cards I had dealt myself.

I remember how worth it was to stay the course.

So when I looked around the gym in the beginning of the year, despite some of the frustrations that can come with a large influx of new people, I saw hope. People were excited about the prospect of achieving their goals. I silently rooted for all of them and I can’t help but think that maybe I should have been more vocal.

I can’t tell you how many are left. It’s not a lot, at least not when I’m at the gym early in the morning. Put bluntly, that sucks.

This post is me begging anyone who’s thrown in the towel to pick it back up. Ask somebody for help if you need to. Put the gym pass back on your key ring. Set your alarm a little early tomorrow and go for a walk (dress warm, it’s cold ‘round these parts.)  If you know someone who has quit, help them change that.

Do something. Do anything that isn’t considered giving up.

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Over the last few years of me taking this journey I’ve become pretty passionate about health and fitness. I don’t force feed the issue to people who don’t want to hear it but I figure that if you’ve clicked on my posts you at least have a passing interest. This next blurb is for those folks who recognize a widespread problem (this has zero political ties, I’m not that guy). We’re an unhealthy people as a whole. It’s killing us. It would’ve killed me.

Below, I’ve posted another TED Talk. This one is from chef Jamie Oliver in 2010 and he makes a pretty compelling case for changing how we approach food. Some of his statistics are rather sobering, to be honest.

I was unhealthy because I didn’t know any better. Not through any malicious intent of the adults in my life; they didn’t have a clue either.  It’s worth a watch at the very least.  Maybe it’ll help those of you with kids teach them to be healthy so that they don’t have to fight an uphill battle later on in life.

 

-Moody

 

 

 

 

I’ve been sitting on this post for a while. I wasn’t really sure where I was going with it, mostly because I wasn’t sure what my actual thoughts on it were.

I know, I wasn’t sure about my own thoughts; a paradox I run into quite often.

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A few months ago I sat down with a friend and we were talking about getting healthy and everything I did to get to where I am today. He was looking to make some changes and wanted to pick my brain; I’m all about that. In the course of that conversation he mentioned something from another conversation he had had with somebody else. (I’m paraphrasing here, it’s been a little while.)

“I’m gonna talk to Moody. He made it, he’s done it.”

He was referencing my weight loss. While I didn’t make an issue of it when he said it, or even think about it for that matter, it started bugging me days later and has been festering in the back of my mind for a while.

While I appreciated his confidence, I didn’t feel like I had made it. Maybe, to the outsider looking in, that seems ludicrous. Let me be clear; I’m happy with the progress I’ve made, I’m happy with where I’m at, and I’m happy with where I’m going. I had to come to those conclusions, though, and I did it quite recently.

When he said that I had “made it,” I felt like an impostor.

“I haven’t done anything,” I thought, “I don’t deserve that.”

Then I moved on. I was able, right after those thoughts, to at least justify it. If I can inspire anyone to make changes to their life and get healthy, so be it. I may not agree whole heartedly with their sentiments regarding myself, but if it gets them started I’m more than happy to contribute.

For a while, I didn’t think about it; water under the bridge, as they say. Then I stumbled across an article about people who used to be unhealthy, whether it was overweight or underweight, and who have now made changes. (For the life of me, I can’t find it again. When I do I will add it to the comments.)

I was a little depressed to realize that the article pegged me. I used to be overweight and had been for so long that it’s hard for me to see anything else. We get this idea in our heads of, “This is what I am and I will be this forever.”

This idea is false. It is a lie we make up for ourselves to limit us. Do not listen to this idea.

People come up to me and say “Look at you! You’re skinny!” I get that they are complimenting me and I’ve always appreciated it, but I had never believed it myself.

Side Rant: Then, I feel like a pregnant woman, because as they say this they go to poke my stomach like they want to make sure I’m not just sucking it in.

STOP THAT. It’s awkward, weird, and sometimes I have this weird reflex of poking you in the eye for doing it. You have been warned.

I had to sit myself down and look at all of the evidence to get myself over these mental hang-ups.

1) I have actually lost weight. The numbers don’t lie.
2) I used to wear 3XL clothes. I now wear plain old large.
3) In fact, all of my clothes are smaller.
4) Well damn. I’m not the person I used to be.

I figured out that it was my own mind holding me back. I wish I could get across to you what it felt like to come to the conclusion that I am healthy. It’s like a breath of fresh air on a crisp spring morning where everything is new, vibrant, and full of potential.

The mirror isn’t lying to you. The scale isn’t lying to you (Mostly. Read this for my thoughts on that). Your clothes are actually fitting differently. You are feeling healthier.

Don’t let that voice in your head tell you that you are who you used to be. Even if you’re just starting out on the road to being healthy, you are already miles away from the person you once were.

-Moody

Got your attention?

Good.

Admittedly, I’ve written a lot about motivation recently.  I meant every word and firmly believe that motivation is a beautiful thing.  Up until this point, however, there has been a flaw that I have failed to mention.

That flaw is the title of this article.  Put another way; motivation is useless.

Bare with me, I promise it will make sense.

Think about all of those times that you’ve felt incredibly motivated.  I’m talking about those moments where you’re on top of the world and nothing can pull you back down.  Now, try hard to remember what occurred right before that moment.

Chances are pretty good that you saw, read, heard, or smelled (if this is you, I want- nay- need to know) something that caused you to decide that. “Today, I will [FILL IN THE BLANK]!!!”

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Maybe you accomplished that goal.  Maybe you started something that’s going to take some time.  Either way, that motivation spurs you into action of some sort and that is awesome.

Until, you know… it’s not.

Until that day you wake up with rain pounding your roof, a cold floor freezing your feet, and a non-existent supply of coffee.  That last one being a disaster in my case.  You know the feeling of having absolutely zero motivation, we all do.

It sucks hard.

Now you’re thinking, “Thanks for that uplifting article… said no one ever.”

I hear ya, I’m gonna fix it.

We can all agree that motivation is an awesome kick-starter.  The trick is finding ways to prolong the results of that initial motivation; luckily, that can be boiled down to one word.

Habits.  Remember those?

I saw a nifty little thing on the interwebz that, with a little modification, should help visualize what it takes to build some solid habits.

Time + Effort = Success.

Sounds good, but I’m going to add one thing:

Time + Consistent Effort = Success.

It doesn’t matter how much effort you put forth when you’re feeling motivated; certainly not in the long run.  The real effort comes when you’ve passed that initial feeling of motivational euphoria and you’ve got to dig deep to stick to your goals, values, and integrity.

When it comes to health and fitness I believe this counts twice as much.  Our society is not engineered to help you be healthy and fit; turn on the T.V. for 5 minutes and you’ll see what I mean.

The key to overcoming that is to set yourself up for success and use that initial motivation to create habits that will help you achieve your goals long after the feeling has left you.

For example, I forced myself to become a morning person so that I could wake up and get to the gym before other distractions take hold of my day.  Sometimes I despise my alarm clock but I get up because it’s become part of my routine.

Look at that equation again up there again.

Consistent action is the key.  If I only make the effort to get up early and workout once; I waste my time.  If I only eat healthy 10% of the time and binge completely the other 90%; I waste my time.

Don’t get me wrong; “consistent” in the world of us regular folks with jobs, commitments, and families definitely does not mean getting it right 100% of the time.  If you can pull that off I’m happy for you, congratulations.

I like Guinness too much.

So, if you’re like me, don’t sweat it.  In fact, if we flip around those numbers I used up above that’s some pretty solid effort.

If you can consistently make all of the right choices for your goals even 90% of the time, you are both human and pretty damn awesome.

So, go and be awesome.

-Moody

P.S. Happy New Year!

I’m gonna change things up a bit this week and let some of my friends do the talking for me.

Kind of.

In reality, I’m going to quote them and then throw my opinion into the mix. Okay, so nothing is actually changing; my bad.

First up is a pretty awesome post from my workout partner via Facebook. I had no idea he was feeling this (publicly) motivational until it popped up on my feed. I think it’s worth a read through:

“I love hearing the excuses people come up with for why they can’t at least make an effort to be active and keep in shape. “I don’t like working out, I don’t have time, don’t have money, don’t have childcare, don’t know what to do or where to start, I’m not motivated”. Today I saw a mother with her one week old baby IN TOW, crushing curls at the gym (get it girl!!). Earlier this week I spoke with a man in his 60’s who after multiple joint surgeries just took up a full combat self defense course (hell yeah!!). Earlier this year my workout partner was like, “meh…I guess I’ll shed 100lbs and get diesel”…and HE DID! (insert spartan battle cry!!) I know a woman near her 3rd trimester who does an hour of muscle endurance work every day (amazing!!). Not long ago I saw a military veteran hobble into the gym on 2 prosthetic legs as he tried to re-learn how to run on a treadmill (oorah!!..and thank you). So anyway… umm…what’s your excuse again?”

I couldn't NOT include this in here.

I couldn’t NOT include this in here.

What I like about this is that these are not hypothetical situations. These are real people, accomplishing real things, dealing with real challenges (and he also gave me a shoutout… awwwwwww) . More importantly, I routinely witness the women that he mentioned doing nothing but kick major ass in the gym. It certainly makes my occasional excuse of, “I’m tired,” seem absurd by comparison. Fellas let’s be honest, if we had to deal with being pregnant we would NOT handle it well…

“The Gym? How about I just wallow here in my self pity?”

Our excuses are self made.  We can choose to make them insurmountable obstacles or we can choose to overcome them and be stronger for it.  It’s all on us.

My next friends post comes from a different place entirely:

“Sometimes you have to ask yourself who you really want to be. It doesn’t matter who others expect you to be or where they see you going; It’s your life to live, don’t let others attempt to live it for you.”

Disclaimer: His statement may not have been aimed at what I’m about to pull the trigger on but I think he’ll be okay with my interpretation. (Dude, if you’re not… whoops.)

He really describes what I had to go through to get to this point. The first part describes how I had to sit down one day, evaluate who/what I was, evaluate who/what I want to be, and come to the realization that change needed to occur.

I’m talking brutal self criticism.

I looked at myself and said, “This does not match what I want for myself. This does not match how I view myself. This must change.”   Of course, it took me a long time to distill it down to those three sentences; sometimes I get wordy.

Hence the blog.

Moving on,everyone should take some time to look at themselves in the metaphorical mirror. I ended up feeling pretty awesome about figuring out where I wanted to go, despite the distance I knew I was going to have to travel to get there.

The second part was a pretty tough pill to swallow. Simply put, it doesn’t matter what other people expect of you.

End of story.

Don’t be fresh, I’m not talking about your boss’ expectations at work. I’m talking about the other they. The people at the gym. The people in the hallway at work. The people who hold absolutely no power over how you choose to live your life.

Many of my biggest fears used to stem from the insecurity that everyone tells you goes away once you break out of your teenage years. I’ve said it before that on some level we are all teenagers who just want people to like us. With age, all we do is get better at hiding this.

Once I got passed everyone else’s expectations, both perceived and otherwise, I was able to focus on me. It’s been a rough road. Lots of people don’t like it when we choose to cut our own path and disregard them and their expectations. The ones who don’t mind, though, those are the people we should keep in touch with.  Fortunately for me, these two guys I’ve quoted up above are just a few examples of that in my life.

Merry (belated) Christmas to everyone, Happy New Year, and all that good stuff!

-Moody

I’m a little rusty on my algebra, but what I’m trying to get across with my title is that working hard is hard work and vice versa.  If you want something you’ve got to work for it because relying on luck isn’t much of a bet.  Kind of a no brainer, right?

Short answer: nope.

I wish I could say that I always bought into the hard work mentality.  I was raised knowing what hard work was, but it took me a while to pull my head out of my ass (as so eloquently put by my Dad…again) and start applying it to my own life.  The truth is that, for the most part, I coasted through life.  Now, that’s not to say I was a societal burden; I worked jobs in high school, was a decent student, volunteered at a fire department, and hung out with friends.

All in all, I was average.  What I wasn’t, though, was ambitious.  Thankfully, who I am today is a far cry from that person.  I think that Jonathan Safran Foer sums up my thoughts best on how I feel about that period of time, “My greatest regret was how much I believed in the future.”

My problem was that I just expected life to happen a certain way.  Graduate high school, go to college, graduate, get job, etc.  There was no thought on my part that things would happen any other way and, when they inevitably did, I floundered.  I thoroughly believed that the sun would rise again the next day and I would keep moving inexorably towards the next phase of my life.  What happens on the day the sun rises and suddenly you’re 80?  What do you say to yourself then, when you realize that your yesterdays outnumber your tomorrows?

Hindsight being 20/20, I can point to the one thing I dislike most about who I was before.  Frankly, I actually find it to be one of the least attractive qualities anyone can possess.

A lack of ambition.

Now, I’m not defining what any one person’s ambition should be.  If you want to go to Starbucks every day and become a connoisseur of all of their offerings with a specialization in their lemon pound cakes (because you guys, YOU GUYS, they are so damn good) be my guest.  But you better attack that goal daily.

Every single day I do something, anything, to get me closer to my goals.  Even if all I manage to accomplish is one thing, it’s a successful day.

Take fitness as an example; eat right, exercise, learn something new about fitness/nutrition, try something new, etc.  Today, I’m not getting to the gym because its rest day but I am eating right and I’m also going to do a little more research into stretching because I suck pretty hard at that.

All of that = today gets a gold star.

Do something every day that brings you closer to your goal and eventually you’ll get it.

When in doubt, though, here’s my old standby :

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-Moody

It’s a funky little word that always seems to get a negative connotation.

Smoking is a bad habit.  This sleep aid is non-habit forming.  Or the one I tend to hear, “You’ve got a real habit of pissing me off.”

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Seems to me like “habits” get a pretty bad rap, good thing it doesn’t have to be that way.

We all know I peruse the interwebz regularly, but it wasn’t until I got into this whole blogging game that I started actually looking specifically for blogs to read.  Fitness/health blogs that I actually care to read on a regular basis are pretty few and far between but I have found a few.

Thesecretlifecoachofdc.wordpress.com  ← gets to gettin people, it’s one of those few I follow regularly.  Also, for my discerning local readers, that does indeed appear to be another D.C. metro local.  I don’t know them, but it’s definitely nice to see another blogger in the area that likes to write about health related stuff in a positive way.

The article concluded with something that was told to them by a former coach, “First you make a habit, then a habit makes you.”  The best part is that they weren’t talking about something negative, in that particular post, they were talking about making running a habit.

Spoiler Alert: that’s a good habit.

Now, this didn’t click in my head until a few things happened.  First a coworker made a comment when I walked by a pound cake that my boss had brought in, “Man, you are way too disciplined with the food thing.”  I disagree… sort of.

I will concede that I used to be disciplined.  When I first started out I would have had to struggle to not grab a quick slice of the latest treat and it would have required some discipline to avoid it.  Now, though, it’s just normal (see also: habit) for me not to eat junk food.  Sure I indulge every once in a while, but I would be happier if somebody brought in some pineapple.

I love me some damn pineapple.

The second thing that made it click was the short walk from my house to my car at 3:45am on my way to the gym before work.  As I looked around my street I noticed the stillness of everything, the lack of lights in windows, and the distinct lack of noise.  I realized that this is normal for me but clearly not for anyone else in my neighborhood.  It’s my morning routine (see also: habit).

Neither of these things used to be a regular aspect of my life.  I used to eat whatever was offered and the gym was an occasional excursion.  Now it’s different; I don’t think about being healthy anymore than I would think about brushing my teeth twice a day.

I’ll be the first to admit that it’s not easy to start doing healthy things on a regular basis.  There will be mistakes and setbacks but if you keep making the effort, eventually, it becomes no effort at all.

Keep going, it gets easier.

-Moody

WHAT?! TWO POSTS IN ONE WEEK?!?! ERMAHGERD!!!

At least that’s what I like to imagine my followers are saying, because it baffles me that people actually read my blog.  So, to begin with, thank you folks for internet stalking me.  It’s truly an oddly gratifying experience.

Moving on, this double feature was brought on the other day when my sister dropped a knowledge bomb on me.  I’m not all that shocked by this considering she’s the “good child”.

You know the type; went to college to learn college things, got her masters in those college things, and now teaches college things to new college going people.  A vicious cycle, if you ask me, and one much better suited to her.

Because this:

It's just not my thing.

It’s just not my thing.

Luckily, she had my fitness endeavors at the forefront of her mind when making these decisions because she majored in something related to exercise physiology and subsequently has become my main source for questions.  A decent perk if you absolutely must put up with another sibling.

She also makes killer banana bread.  Hint sis, it is Christmas time.

In my never ending quest for improvement, I started looking into tracking my caloric intake which eventually led to me to a whole bunch of articles about these things called Macros, leading to a very important question.

WTF is a macro?

The answer is that macro is short for Macro-nutrient which refers to the three main things we eat; protein, carbohydrates, and fat.  All of which are completely necessary to having a healthy human body.

Just for the sake of answering the question, there are also Micro-nutrients which refer to the stuff you might get out of a daily vitamin.  Also very necessary.

Anyways, we all know that this isn’t really my shtick.  I don’t write this blog to wax poetic about scientific things that I barely understand.  Sure, I’ve taught myself a lot about tracking my caloric/macronutrient intake and it seems to work for me, but the real purpose of this post is my sister’s aforementioned knowledge bomb, probably to her complete displeasure.

“Here’s the issue: you can number crunch all you like, however your body will act the way it naturally does regardless of all the “perfect” ratio numbers I could throw at you.”

BOOM.  KNOWLEDGE BOMB.

While out of context, you might compare me to Indiana Jones in search of the golden ratio of macro’s I should be eating (which I totally would never do because there is no way I could compare to him….unless, you know, you wanted to) I really wasn’t.  I was just asking for her help since she’s all educated and junk.

Regardless, her statement got me thinking.  There is definitely such a thing as obsessing too much over the little things when it comes to fitness.  For instance, I casually track my intake.  Seriously.  I don’t freak out when my numbers vary a bit from day to day because I’m not a figure competitor or bodybuilder, nor do I plan to be.  For that, you are welcome.

I think this over-thinking can ultimately lead to over-complication and, subsequently, not achieving your fitness goals or even giving up altogether.  I’ve mentioned in the past that people should “trust the process.”  Don’t you just love ubiquitous statements that tell you absolutely nothing?

That’s my bad, I’m gonna clear it up right now.

All you have to do to be healthy is:

  1.  Eat good/healthy food.  Whole foods.  Vegetables.  Fruit.  Skip the fast food.
  2.  Exercise.  Be active.  Workout at the gym.  Go for a walk.  Don’t sit on the couch or in your        office chair all day.
  3.  Repeat.  Keep going.  Commit to a better lifestyle.  Don’t give up or let an “off” day lead               you to quitting.

Anything that becomes more complex than that is completely unnecessary.  The KISS principle applies to being healthy.

Keep it Simple Shithead.  (In my defense, that’s how my Dad used to say it to me.  I guess you could substitute “Stupid” in there.  To each his own.)

So, trust the process and don’t over-complicate things.

Oh, and sis, seriously… the banana bread.

-Moody